BIBLIOGRAPHY OF WRITINGS BY MEREDITH EGAN

Egan, Meredith and Forget, Marc.  (2004).  Becoming Peacemakers:  Rethinking Just Relationships in our Schools.  Deep Humanity Institute.    

"Becoming Peacemakers" is for educators, parents, students and other community members interested in fostering a fundamental change in the way conflict and violence are addressed in our schools and communities. The book is a guide that introduces the reader to the philosophy and practices that bring about a restorative approach to behaviour, transgressions and discipline. It is not a step-by-step tool to enable anyone to reproduce the program without any other training; rather, it is intended as an introduction to a radically different approach to working with young people, as well as a resource for those interested in training as facilitators with Marc and Meredith.

Egan, Meredith.  (2004).  When Prison Doesn’t Work.  QCJJ Newsletter, Number 54.

Abstract: Events this month in Vernon, British Columbia have reminded me of a very personal lesson I learned 16 years ago about how far the depths of tragedy can reach when prison doesn’t work.  Let us come together to understand and share the word that while conflict will always exist, responding with compassion and caring will lead us much more quickly to live with one another, “on earth as it is in heaven”.  Let us challenge ourselves to embrace the discarded, and make sense of the tragedies that will inevitably occur because of our current prison system.  Look to those tragedies for clues as to ‘what went wrong’, and find more compassionate, effective solutions.  And cry out for justice for all who have been harmed.

 

Egan, Meredith.  (2004).  Young Friends and Justice.  QCJJ Newsletter, Number 53.

Abstract: Young Friends are loosely defined by Quakers as a group of Friends who are between the ages of 16 and 30; some Young Friends are older than this and some are younger.  Young Friend Amy-Jean Singleton-Polster, in an interview, shares her perspective on questions about justice, and why she is working on Living Justice.

 

Egan, Meredith.  (2004).  ?  Canadian Friend.   Number 52.

Abstract: In early June of this year, 300 people gathered in Vancouver near English Bay to explore issues and concerns regarding restorative practices.  They came from 6 continents and a variety of workplaces, willing to engage in dialogue and friendship.  We have gathered some of the gleanings from this event, and think they speak to the nature of the discussion over four days, and beyond.

 

Egan, Meredith.  (2004).  Living Justice as Spiritual Discernment: Crafting a Charter for Practitioners of Restorative Justice.  Quaker Concern, Canadian Friends Service Committee, Vol. 30, No. 1.

Abstract: For about a year, I had the honour of meeting with a group of skilled, experienced restorative justice practitioners in the Lower Mainland of BC.  Our goal included creating a common vision for good practice.  It was an opportunity for me to contemplate how my beliefs affect my behaviour, and how individuals create the social understandings that build healthy communities.

 

Stutzman, Eric; Abramson, Alana; Egan, Meredith.  (2003).  A Charter for Practitioners of Restorative Justice.  6th International Conference on Restorative Justice.  Retrieved May 16, 2005, from http://www.sfu.ca/cfrj/fulltext/charter.pdf

Preamble:  The purpose of this document is to articulate that which guides us in our work, practice, and commitment to restorative justice. The following is a Charter for Practitioners of Restorative Justice that is a living, breathing document – a continuous work in progress. This draft is based on the discussions and contributions of various practitioners in the field of restorative justice in the Province of British Columbia and beyond. We wish to recognize the many tributary streams that fed our dialogues and honour all who have taught us. We respectfully acknowledge that restorative practices strive to embody values and principles that are akin to and informed by holistic peace and justice making processes in many First Nations communities. We gathered as a group with history and experience, not to attempt to set the standard for the field, but to carefully consider the ethics surrounding our personal practice.

 

Buffam, Bonar and Egan, Meredith. (2003).  Discussion Paper examining the Draft Documents: Values and Principles of Restorative Justice in Criminal Matters, and Canadian Principles and Program Guidelines for the use of Restorative Justice in Criminal Matters.  Sixth International Conference on Restorative Justice.  Retrieved on May 16th, 2005 from: http://www.sfu.ca/cfrj/fulltext/buffam.pdf

Abstract:  This paper critically examines the Federal Department of Justice’s drafts of the “Values and Principles of Restorative Justice” and “Canadian Principles and Program Guidelines for the Use of Restorative Justice in Criminal Matters”. The paper begins with an analysis of the values and principles drafted by the government. Despite acknowledging the inclusion of a number of key restorative principles, this paper details the problems of the overtly legalistic grounding of the quasi-retributive document. The paper then proceeds to scrutinize the document containing the proposed principles and program guidelines prepared by members of the federal government. While the second draft document’s utilization of certain grass-roots concepts are acknowledged as evidence of progress in the government’s involvement in restorative justice initiatives, this paper asserts that, should they be implemented, both draft documents’ inability to grasp the entirety of the restorative paradigm will result in the eventual co-optation of restorative justice initiatives. The paper concludes by recommending the federal government either overhaul the content of both documents or adopt a new strategy in the promotion of restorative justice initiatives.

 

Egan, Meredith, Smith, Lisa and MacMillan, Scott.  (2003).  Best Practices in Restorative Justice – an International Perspective.  Gleanings from the Sixth International Conference on Restorative Justice, June 1-4, 2003, Vancouver B.C.  QCJJ Newsletter, Number 52.

Abstract: In early June of this year, 300 people gathered in Vancouver near English Bay to explore issues and concerns regarding restorative practices.  They came from 6 continents and a variety of workplaces, willing to engage in dialogue and friendship.  We have gathered some of the gleanings from this event, and think they speak to the nature of the discussion over four days, and beyond.

 

Egan, Meredith.  (2003).  Restorative Justice in Schools.  Quaker Concern, Canadian Friends Service Committee, Vol. 29, No. 3.

Abstract: Through more than eight years of restorative justice work in schools across Canada, in the US and in Latin America (through and beyond CFSC programmes), we have had to engage with issues that brought us into unknown territory.  The insights we’ve gained have deepened our understanding of restorative justice in the broader context.  Achieving restorative justice is a long journey that must begin with our young people.

 

Egan, Meredith.  (2003).  Richard Dubé’s The Haven – a True Story of Life in the Hole (a review).  QCJJ Newsletter, Number 51.

Abstract:  The Haven – A True Story of Life in the Hole is one man’s recounting of his experiences as a prisoner in Canada, with some recollections of his life prior to incarceration.  As Quakers, what are we called to do to challenge a system that perpetuates such hate and pain?  What sayest thou?

 

Egan, Meredith; Forget, Marc.  (2002) Simon Fraser University’s Unique Centre for Restorative Justice .  QCJJ Newsletter, Number 49.

Abstract:  The Centre for Restorative Justice is tucked in a corner of the lower level of the School of Criminology at SFU. As staff and resources increase the Centre is to become a facility of national importance for research and education in restorative justice, for practitioners, students and academics.

 

Egan, Meredith.  (2002).  A Story of Restorative Justice and Principles in a School Setting.  Correctional Service of Canada: Towards a Justice that Heals.

Abstract:  A brief synopsis of a roll-play involving high school students, zero-tolerance for alcohol and prom.  Includes reflective questions.